STRIPE REVEAL

Last Friday marked the last color of Everyday, a color at Irving Street Projects. How many colors was it you ask?  FIFTY!  Why fifty you might venture to know?  I needed a number.  A number with some significance that I could attain in the amount of time that I had at the space.  56 maybe?  Which according to Artistotle is the number of layers of the Universe.  52, I thought... which is the number of weeks in a year.  After losing a few days at the space for travel for a project, I settled on 50.  For no better reason than, when asked how many layers were painted over the course of the project and wanting so badly to yell FIFTY! while simultaneously kicking my leg high into the air (see SNL's Molly Shannon skit to make any sense of this nonsense/the main inspiration.) 

Behind the stripe scene at Irving Street Projects // Fifty cans of paint

Behind the stripe scene at Irving Street Projects // Fifty cans of paint

The Reveal took place on Friday, May 15th and it was one of the loveliest evenings I have known. For those of you who couldn't make it, not to worry!  Sarah Klein, who works in stop-motion animation and curates the Stop & Go animation showcase, documented the reveal and created these sensational gifs below.  This summer, she will be curating for the San Francisco Peephole Cinema and she recently  finished this animated music video for the band Synchronized Watches.

Click on gifs above to scroll through and see the progression of tape being removed.  Thank-you gif-master, Sarah Klein!

A moving stripe painting.

It was like going back in time, while being very much there at the same time.  Kate Haug, who wrote an amazing piece about the project for SFAQ mentioned afterwards... At the same time, being very much there with such good people, so many of whom helped make for such a nice event.  

Friends showed up sporting their stripes, neighbors in head-to-color color. After the tape was removed and stripes revealed, ISP Director Kelly Inouye and I sat down with writer, curator, and someone I consider a renaissance woman, Christian L. Frock  for a conversation about color, community, stripes and endurance, beginnings and ends.